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1818 Courses

The 1818 Advanced College Credit program offers courses in more than 20 areas of study. Most subjects have a Saint Louis University faculty liaison who can answer questions and provide additional course information.

The 1818 Advanced College Credit course ledger provides a full listing of courses offered at each participating high school. Any changes to this ledger can be requested by the 1818 Advanced College Credit coordinator through the ledger verification form.

All courses are also offered on Saint Louis University's campus and can be viewed in the course catalog. Please note that students should consult with an academic advisor at prospective undergraduate institutions regarding transferability of courses. Students interested in pre-med, engineering and health sciences tracks should denote that dual-credit science courses may need to be retaken at the undergraduate institution, including Saint Louis University.

Information on SLU’s grading policy is available through the Office of the Registrar.

Accounting

Faculty Liaison: Heather Bednarek, Ph.D.

ACCT 2200 - Financial Accounting
Credit(s): 3 Credits
An introduction to the financial reporting results of operations, cash flow and financial position of corporate entities through general purpose financial statements. Emphasis is placed on the real-world environment of business and the use of financial accounting information for management decision-making.
Restrictions: Students in the Schl for Professional Studies college may not enroll.


ACCT 2220 - Accounting for Decision Making
Credit(s): 3 Credits
An introduction to the design and use of accounting information within an organization. Emphasis is placed on cost and revenue analysis for planning and control of organizational units and activities.
Prerequisite(s): ACCT 2220 
Restrictions: Students in the Schl for Professional Studies college may not enroll.

Anthropology

Faculty Liaison: Arline Cravens, Ph.D.

ANTH 1200 - Introduction to Anthropology
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to the primary theories, concepts, and methodologies relating to anthropology. The main subfields of cultural anthropology, archeology, biological anthropology, linguistics, and applied anthropology are surveyed and their integration is highlighted for a more in-depth understanding of the complexities in modern human societies and behavior.
Attributes: Global Citizenship (A&S), Service Learning, Social Science Req (A&S)

ANTH 2200 - Cultural Anthropology
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course provides an introduction to the theoretical foundations and methodological approaches of Cultural Anthropology. It focuses on the concept of culture and how it relates to various topics, including ethnicity, language, adaptive strategies, kinship, political systems, gender, and religion. The purpose to the course is to give students a broad perspective on the types of anthropological research and discus how the work of anthropologists is relevant to understanding the human condition.
Attributes: Global Citizenship (A&S), International Studies, International Studies-General, Social Science Req (A&S)

Art

Faculty Liaison: Katie Donovan, M.A.

ART 2000 - Drawing I
Credit(s): 3 Credits
An introduction to the basic elements in drawing. Line and mass as a means to explore objective and spatial concepts in various media. A lab fee is required. Satisfies core requirement in Fine Arts.
Attributes: Fine Arts Requirement (A&S)

Art History

Faculty Liaison: Bradley Bailey, Ph.D.

ARTH 1000 - Approaching the Arts
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Presents an introduction to the world of the visual arts with the goal of developing an understanding of important themes, functions, media, principles of design, and visual characteristics found in art.
Attributes: Fine Arts Requirement (A&S)


ARTH 1010 - History of Western Art
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Presents a chronological survey of the major periods of art history (ancient, medieval, early modern, and modern) and introduces students to key concepts, terminology, analytical strategies, and critical questions relevant to understanding art.
Attributes: Catholic Studies-Elective, Fine Arts Requirement (A&S)

Astronomy

Faculty Liaisons: Vijai Dixit, Ph.D.

PHYS 1130 - Introduction to Astronomy
Credit(s): 1 or 3 Credits
Modern concepts of the physical nature of the astronomical universe. Fulfills three credit hours of the general science requirement. For non-science majors; does not apply toward the area of concentration with a major in physics.
Prerequisite(s): (0 Course from MATH 120-4999 or Math Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1200)
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)

Biology

Faculty Liaison: Betsy Angeli, M.S.

BIOL 1240 - Principles of Biology I
Credit(s): 3 Credits
First semester of the two-semester Principles of Biology sequence. Students learn about chemical and molecular basis of living organisms, cell structure and function, gene structure, expression and heredity, animal anatomy and physiology, and animal development. In addition to learning concepts in biology, students practice critical thinking and problem-solving.
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)

BIOL 1245 - Principles of Biology I Laboratory
Credit(s): 1 Credit
This course covers experimental approaches used in molecular and cellular biology, genetics, and animal physiology. Students will learn to use scientific instruments and techniques implemented in these fields. Students will propose and test hypotheses, collect and analyze data, represent data visually, and practice written and oral scientific communication skills.
Prerequisite(s): (BIOL 1240* or BIOL 1931*)
* Concurrent enrollment allowed.
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)


BIOL 1260 - Principles of Biology II
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Second semester of the two-semester Principles of Biology sequence. Students learn fundamental principles of evolution, the diversity of life, plant biology and ecology. In addition to learning scientific concepts in biology, students practice critical thinking and problem-solving.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1240*
* Concurrent enrollment allowed.
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)


BIOL 1265 - Principles of Biology II Laboratory
Credit(s): 1 Credit
This course covers the basic experimental approaches used in studying evolution, ecology, and community biology. Students will be taught how to use scientific instruments and laboratory techniques implemented in these fields. Students will learn to propose and test hypotheses and to collect, analyze and present data. In addition, they will gain experience in written and oral scientific communication skills.
Prerequisite(s): BIOL 1260*
* Concurrent enrollment allowed.
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)

Calculus

Faculty Liaison: John Kalliongis, Ph.D.

MATH 1510 - Calculus I
Credit(s): 4 Credits
Functions; continuity; limits; the derivative; differentiation from graphical, numerical and analytical viewpoints; optimization and modeling; rates and related rates; the definite integral; antiderivatives from graphical, numerical and analytical viewpoints. (Offered every Fall, Spring and Summer)
Prerequisite(s): (Math Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1400 or MATH 1400 with a grade of C- or higher)
Attributes: Mathematics BA Req (A&S), Mathematics BS Req (A&S)


MATH 1520 - Calculus II
Credit(s): 4 Credits
Symbolic and numerical techniques of integration, improper integrals, applications using the definite integral, sequences and series, power series, Taylor series, differential equations. (Offered every Fall, Spring and Summer)
Prerequisite(s): (Math Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1510, MATH 1510 with a grade of C- or higher, or AP Calculus AB with a minimum score of 4)
Attributes: Mathematics BA Req (A&S), Mathematics BS Req (A&S)

MATH 2530 - Calculus III
Credit(s): 4 Credits
Three-dimensional analytic geometry, vector-valued functions, partial differentiation, multiple integration, and line integrals. (Offered every Fall and Spring)
Prerequisite(s): (0 Course from MATH 1520-4999 or Math Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1520)
Attributes: Mathematics BA Req (A&S), Mathematics BS Req (A&S) 

Chemistry

Faculty Liaison: Paul Jelliss, Ph.D. 

CHEM 1110 - General Chemistry 1
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Introduction to chemistry: periodic table, elements, nomenclature, atomic structure, chemical bonding, gas laws, chemical reactions. Lecture 3 hours/week. Offered Fall, Spring, and Summer.
Prerequisite(s): ((CHEM 1050 with a grade of C- or higher, CHEM 1060 with a grade of C- or higher, or Chemistry Placement Waiver with a minimum score of 1050); (SLU Math Index with a minimum score of 950, Math Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1200, MATH 1200, MATH 1320, MATH 1400, MATH 1510, or MATH 1520))
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)

CHEM 1115 - General Chemistry 1 Laboratory
Credit(s): 1 Credit
The laboratory course to complement the first semester of General Chemistry. Laboratory: 3 hours/week. Fall, Spring, and Summer semesters.
Prerequisite(s): ((CHEM 1110* or CHEM 1130*))
* Concurrent enrollment allowed.
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)

CHEM 1120 - General Chemistry 2
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Continuation of Chemistry 1110 covering redox reactions and electrochemistry, chemical kinetics and thermodynamics, nuclear chemistry, transition metal chemistry, and descriptive chemistry of the elements. Lecture 3 hours/week. Spring and Summer only.
Prerequisite(s): ((CHEM 1110 with a grade of C- or higher or CHEM 1130 with a grade of C- or higher))
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)

CHEM 1125 - General Chemistry 2 Laboratory
Credit(s): 1 Credit
The lab course to complement CHEM 1120 and CHEM 1140. Students must have completed CHEM 1115 (or its equivalent) with C- or better. Offered spring and summer.
Prerequisite(s): (CHEM 1115 with a grade of C- or higher; (CHEM 1140* with a grade of C- or higher or CHEM 1120* with a grade of C- or higher))
* Concurrent enrollment allowed.
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)

 

Chinese

Faculty Liaison: Maimaiti Minawae, M.A.

CHIN 1010 - Communicating In Chinese I
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Prerequisites: None Introduction to basic pronunciation (pinyin), simple sentence structure. Simple oral comprehension and speaking Chinese. Vocabulary items and useful phrases for surviving simple daily life and travel in China.

CHIN 1020 - Communicating In Chinese II
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Development of Chinese vocabulary, oral comprehension, fundamentals of Chinese grammar, reading, writing and speaking capabilities. Introduction to Chinese culture.
Prerequisite(s): (CHIN 1010, Chinese Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1010, or LP Chinese Placement with a minimum score of 2)
Attributes: Foreign Language BS Req (A&S)

CHIN 2010 - Intermediate Chinese I
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Development and refinement of Chinese vocabulary, oral comprehension, fundamentals of Chinese grammar, reading, writing and speaking capabilities. Introduction to Chinese culture and business protocols.
Prerequisite(s): (CHIN 1020, Chinese Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1020, or LP Chinese Placement with a minimum score of 3)
Attributes: Foreign Language BA Req (A&S), Foreign Language BS Req (A&S)

CHIN 2020 - Intermediate Chinese II
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Development and refinement of Chinese language skills by introducing Chinese culture through extensive readings of Chinese literature and history.
Prerequisite(s): (CHIN 2010, Chinese Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 2010, or LP Chinese Placement with a minimum score of 4)
Attributes: Foreign Language BA Req (A&S), Foreign Language BS Req (A&S)

College Algebra

Faculty Liaison: Mike May, S.J., Ph.D.

MATH 1200 - College Algebra
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Brief review of algebraic essentials, graphs, functions and their graphs, linear and quadratic functions, polynomial and rational functions, exponential and logarithmic functions, systems of linear equations. Intended for students needing more preparation before taking MATH-1320 or MATH-1400. Fall, spring and summer.
Prerequisite(s): (MATH 0250 with a grade of C- or higher, Math Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 0250, or MATH 0260 with a grade of C- or higher)
Attributes: Mathematics BA Req (A&S)

Communication

Faculty Liaison: Elizabeth Richard, Ph.D.

CMM 1200 - Public Speaking
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Students are introduced to principles of effective public speaking and provided with opportunities to develop public speaking skills. In addition, standards of evaluation for public communication are established for use in evaluating their own and other's public speaking performances.

CMM 2400 - Media and Society
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This introductory course provides students with the background and critical skills necessary for understanding how media work and how they impact our everyday lives. It seeks to give students critical media analytical skills necessary to succeed as professionals, citizens, and members of a community. Satisfies social science requirement for A&S.
Attributes: Film Studies, Social Science Req (A&S)

Computer Science

Faculty Liaison: David Ferry, Ph.D.

CSCI 1010 - Introduction to Computer Science: Principles
Credit(s): 3 Credits
A broad survey of the computer science discipline, focusing on the computer's role in representing, storing, manipulating, organizing and communicating information. Topics include hardware, software, algorithms, operating systems, networks.

CSCI 1300 - Introduction to Object-Oriented Programming
Credit(s): 4 Credits
An introduction to computer programming based upon early coverage of object-oriented principles such as classes, methods, inheritance and polymorphism, together with treatment of traditional flow of control structures. Good software development practices will also be established, including issues of design, documentation, and testing.
Prerequisite(s): ((0 Course from CSCI 1010-1090, BME 2000 with a grade of C- or higher, or CVNG 1500 with a grade of C- or higher); (MATH 1200 or 0 Course from MATH 1320-4999))
Attributes: Foreign Language BA Req (A&S)

Economics

Faculty Liaison: Heather Bednarek, Ph.D.

ECON 1900 - Principles of Economics
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Analysis of how individuals, firms, and nations make choices given limited resources; determinants of decision making in market economies; the political economy of income, employment, and inflation in the aggregate; the role of government and the Federal reserve.
Prerequisite(s): (MATH 1200, MATH 1320, MATH 1400, MATH 1510, MATH 1520, MATH 2530, Math Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1200, or Math Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1320)
Restrictions: Students in the Schl for Professional Studies college may not enroll.
Attributes: International Studies

Education

Faculty Liaison: Maureen Witeke Lee, Ph.D.

 

EDF 2010 - Foundations of Education
Credit(s): 3 Credits
A systematic analysis of how social issues impact schools forcing continual change and reform. Each part of educational system will be analyzed including organization philosophy, environment, management, and assessment. Field experiences are required and structured to focus on early childhood education, elementary education and special education for mild/moderate disorders.

EDF 2020 - Foundations of Elementary Education
Credit(s): 3 Credits
A systematic analysis of how social issues impact schools forcing continual change and reform. Each part of educational system will be analyzed including organization philosophy, environment, management, and assessment. Field experiences are required and structured to focus on early childhood education (1 - 6).
Corequisite(s): EDI 2940

EDF 2030 - Foundations of Middle School Education
Credit(s): 3 Credits
A systematic analysis of how social issues impact schools forcing continual change and reform. Each part of educational system will be analyzed including organization philosophy, environment, management, and assessment. Field experiences are required and structured to focus on early childhood education (5 - 9).
Corequisite(s): EDI 2940


EDF 2040 - Foundations of Secondary Education
Credit(s): 3 Credits
A systematic analysis of how social issues impact schools forcing continual change and reform. Each part of educational system will be analyzed including organization philosophy, environment, management, and assessment. Field experiences are required and structured to focus on early childhood education (9 - 12).
Corequisite(s): EDI 2940

EDI 2940 - Portfolio Development I
Credit(s): 0 Credits
This course covers the principles and practices of portfolio development as they pertain to students in Block II course and is specifically designed to address components of students Program Portfolio. Course products at this level include selection of three artifacts and composition of 3 medication statements representing three of the ten standards addressed by the portfolio.

English

Faculty Liaisons: Ted Mathys, M.F.A.. and Ted Ibur, M.A.

ENGL 1500 - The Process of Composition
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Develops effective personal and expository prose writing skills, including methods of invention, organization, audience analysis, and style. Focuses on the compositional process.

ENGL 1900 - Advanced Strategies Of Rhetoric and Research
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Studies complex structures of language including its logical and persuasive possibilities. Emphasizes analytical reading, critical thinking, and research methodology skills. Prerequisite: ENGL-150, or equivalent.
Prerequisite(s): (ENGL 1500, ENGL 1505, ACT English with a minimum score of 25, SAT Verbal with a minimum score of 600, EVIDENCE-BASED READ/WRIT SCORE with a minimum score of 600, English Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1500, or SLU English Portfolio with a minimum score of P)
Attributes: Foundations of Discourse (A&S)

ENGL 2250 - Conflict, Social Justice and Literature
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Cultural Conflict and Social Justice. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres - including drama, poetry, and fiction - the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.
Attributes: Literature BA Requirement(A&S), Urban Poverty - Social Justice

ENGL 2350 - Faith, Doubt and Literature
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Faith and Doubt. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres - including drama, poetry, and fiction - this course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.
Attributes: Literature BA Requirement(A&S)

ENGL 2450 - Nature, Ecology & Literature
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Nature and Ecology. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres - including drama, poetry, and fiction - the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.
Attributes: Literature BA Requirement(A&S)

ENGL 2550 - Gender, Identity & Literature
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Gender and Identity. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres - including drama, poetry, and fiction - the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.
Attributes: Literature BA Requirement(A&S), Women's & Gender Studies

ENGL 2650 - Technology, Media & Literature
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Technology and Media. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres - including drama, poetry, and fiction - the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.
Attributes: Literature BA Requirement(A&S)

ENGL 2750 - Film, Culture and Literature
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of Film and Culture. Through the reading of a wide variety of genres - including drama, poetry, and fiction - the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative writing.
Attributes: Film Studies, Literature BA Requirement(A&S)

ENGL 2850 - Nation, Identity and Literature
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course introduces literary study within the context and theme of nation and identity. Through reading a wide variety of genres - including drama, fiction, and poetry - the course engages students in literary ways of knowing. Methods include close reading, comparative textual analysis, and argumentative and reflective writing.
Attributes: Literature BA Requirement(A&S)

Environmental Science

Faculty Liaison: Dan Hanes, Ph.D.

EAS 1010 - Earth Systems I-The Solid Earth
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course covers the interactions between land, water, air, and life with special emphasis on humans and the environment. EAS 1010 focuses on the solid earth and surface environments; EAS 1030 focuses on the oceans and atmosphere. Either course can be taken independently. Satisfies Science Core requirement.
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)

EAS 1050 - Introduction to Oceanography
Credit(s): 1 or 3 Credits
Lecture three hours per week. Provides an introduction to ocean basin formation, chemical and physical properties of sea water, waves, currents, tidal forces and tides, interaction of land and ocean in coastal environments, marine biology and ocean resources. Fulfills three hours of science requirement. Spring semester, alternate years.
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)

EAS 1080 - Introduction to Environmental Science
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course is a first introduction to the main topics of environmental science, with emphasis on human interactions with the environment. Sustainability is a unifying theme throughout the course. The knowledge and skills learned in this course will inform and guide students’ life-decisions and their impacts on the environment. Topics covered include the scientific process and critical thinking, matter and energy, ecosystem ecology and biomes, evolution, biodiversity, community ecology, human population growth, geologic processes, land resources and agriculture, nonrenewable and renewable energy, water resources and water pollution, air pollution, solid waste generation and disposal, human health risk, conservation of biodiversity, climate alteration and global warming.
Attributes: International Studies, International Studies-Health, Natural Science Req (A&S)

EAS 1081 - Introduction to Environmental Science Laboratory
Credit(s): 1 Credit
This is a laboratory to complement EAS 1080, Introduction to Environmental Science. The lab is intended primarily for science, engineering, and other majors with a strong interest in Environmental Science. Topics covered include: matter and energy, evolution, biodiversity, community ecology, human population growth, geologic processes, land resources, agriculture, energy, water, air, solid waste, human health, and climate change.
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)

Forensic Science

Faculty Liaison: Barbara Weekley, M.A.

FRSC 2600 - Survey of Forensic Science
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Students learn scientific methodology, its rules and norms, as applied in the biological and chemical analysis of crime and how these methodologies are used to evaluate legal arguments and solve legal issues. They also learn how the technical/scientific analysis articulates with the different components of the legal system.
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S), Social Science Req (A&S)

French

Faculty Liaison: Arline Cravens, Ph.D.

FREN 1010 - Communicating in French I
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Introduction to French language and culture: reading, writing, speaking, listening. The course emphasizes the acquisition of communicative skills.

FREN 1020 - Communicating in French II
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Continuation of FREN 1010. Expansion of oral and written communication skills in areas of immediate needs, personal interests and daily life.
Prerequisite(s): (FREN 1010, French Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1010, or LP French Placement with a minimum score of 2)
Attributes: Foreign Language BS Req (A&S)

FREN 2010 - Intermediate French Language & Culture
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Continued practice in and development of all language skills, enabling the student to function in an increased number of areas. Materials and discussion relating to French culture.
Prerequisite(s): (FREN 1020, French Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1020, or LP French Placement with a minimum score of 3)
Attributes: Foreign Language BA Req (A&S)

FREN 2220 - French Culture & Civilization
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Attributes: Foreign Language BA Req (A&S), Foreign Language BS Req (A&S)

Geology

Faculty Liaison: Dan Hanes, Ph.D.

EAS 1010 - Earth Systems I-The Solid Earth
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course covers the interactions between land, water, air and life with special emphasis on humans and the environment. EAS 1010 focuses on the solid earth and surface environments; EAS 1030 focuses on the oceans and atmosphere. Either course can be taken independently. Satisfies Science Core requirement.
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)

German

Faculty Liaison: Gregory Divers, Ph.D.

GR 1010 - Communicating in German I
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Introduction to German language and culture: speaking, listening, reading and writing. Emphasis on the acquisition of communicative skills.

GR 1020 - Communicating in German II
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Continuation of GR 1010. Expansion of all language skills, enabling the student to function in simple situations related to immediate needs, personal interests and daily life.
Prerequisite(s): (GR 1010, German Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1010, or LP German Placement with a minimum score of 2)
Attributes: Foreign Language BS Req (A&S)

GR 2010 - Intermediate German: Language & Culture
Credit(s)
: 3 Credits
Continued practice in and development of all language skills, enabling the student to function in an increased number of areas. Materials and discussion relating to German culture.
Prerequisite(s): (GR 1020, German Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1020, or LP German Placement with a minimum score of 3)
Attributes: Foreign Language BA Req (A&S)

Greek

Faculty Liaison: Joan Hart-Hasler, Ph.D.

GK 1010 - Reading Greek I
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Pronunciation, vocabulary, morphology, syntax, and practice in reading.
Attributes: Catholic Studies-Elective

GK 1020 - Reading Greek II
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Vocabulary, morphology, syntax, and practice in reading. Easier Greek authors introduced.
Prerequisite(s): (GK 1010 or Greek Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1010)
Attributes: Catholic Studies-Elective, Foreign Language BS Req (A&S)

GK 1200 - Greek Literature Translation
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Vocabulary; intermediate grammar; more extensive reading in easier authors; selections from more difficult ancient authors.
Prerequisite(s): (GK 1020 or Greek Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1020)

GK 2010 - Intermediate Greek Lang & Lit
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Vocabulary; intermediate grammar; more extensive reading in easier authors; selections from more difficult ancient authors.
Prerequisite(s): (GK 1020 or Greek Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1020)
Attributes: Catholic Studies-Elective, Foreign Language BA Req (A&S)

History

Faculty Liaisons: Flannery Burke, Ph.D. and Thomas Finan, Ph.D.

HIST 1110 - Origins of the Modern World to 1500
Credit(s): 3 Credits
An historical approach to understanding the development of the modern world to 1500. The course will examine ancient civilizations, the Hebrews, Greece, Rome, Christianity, Islam, Byzantium, the Middle Ages, The Renaissance, and encounters between cultures and regions of the globe.
Attributes: Catholic Studies-History, History Requirement (A&S)

HIST 1120 - Origins of the Modern World, 1500 to Present
Credit(s): 3 Credits
An historical approach to understanding the development of the modern world from 1500 to the present. The course will examine the cross-cultural impact of European expansion, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the Scientific Revolution, absolutism, the Enlightenment, the French and Industrial Revolutions, nineteenth and twentieth century thought the World Wars, totalitarian and liberation movements, and the challenges of the new global age.
Attributes: Catholic Studies-History, History Requirement (A&S)

HIST 1600 - History of the U.S. to 1865
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course covers American history from the period of contact through the Civil War. Topics include the collision of European, African, and Native American cultures in the age of contact and settlement; colonial British North America; the American Revolution and the Constitution; geographic expansion and social, economic, and cultural change in the Jacksonian era; slavery and the sectional conflict, and the Civil War.

HIST 1610 - History of the United States Since 1865
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course will survey the major historical developments in American history as the United States emerged as a major world power. The course will examine such issues as the shift from a rural agrarian to an urban industrial nation, the changing view of the role of government in society and the economy, and the evolution of foreign policy from nineteenth century isolation to world super power in the years after World War II.

Information Technology Management

Faculty Liaison: Heather Bednarek, Ph.D.

ITM 2000 - Information Technology with Supply Chains
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course introduces students to the development, implementation and use of information systems in organizations. It is intended to prepare students for living and working in an information-rich, networked world and to introduce students to the profession of ITM. A variety of computer software is utilized to fulfill the objectives. Major topics include: e-commerce and the Internet; the creation, storage and usage of data, information and knowledge; systems development; the application of information systems in organizations and functional areas; and the use of computer resources for problem-solving. As more and more businesses globally adopt enterprise systems, it becomes increasingly important for students to understand how real-world business processes are managed and executed. (Offered every Fall and Spring)

International Business 

Faculty Liaison: Heather Bednarek, Ph.D.

IB 2000 - Introduction to International Business
Credit(s): 3 Credits
A broadly based introduction to the field of international business. Consists of an inter-disciplinary survey of the fundamentals of (1) international trade; (2) environmental factors; (3) international institutions and agencies; and (4) company organization, managerial functions and operations around the world.
Prerequisite(s): ECON 1900
Restrictions: Students in the Schl for Professional Studies college may not enroll.
Attributes: International Studies-Economy

Italian

Faculty Liaison: Simone Bergni, Ph.D.

ITAL 1010 - Communicating in Italian I
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Introduction to Italian language and culture. Emphasis on acquiring communicative skills.

ITAL 1020 - Communicating in Italian II
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Expansion of oral and written communication skills in areas of daily life and personal interest.
Prerequisite(s): (ITAL 1010 or Italian Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1010)
Attributes: Foreign Language BS Req (A&S)

ITAL 2010 - Intermediate Italian: Language & Culture
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Continued practice in all skills, enabling students. Reading in and discussion of Italian culture.
Prerequisite(s): (ITAL 1020, ITAL 1200, or Italian Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1020)
Attributes: Foreign Language BA Req (A&S)

Latin

Faculty Liaison: Joan Hart-Hasler, Ph.D.

LATN 1010 - Reading Latin I
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Pronunciation, vocabulary, morphology, syntax, and practice in reading. Material includes the first through the fourth declensions; the indicative forms of sum and of the regular verbs; some demonstrative, interrogative, personal, reflexive, possessive, relative, and intensive pronouns.
Attributes: Catholic Studies-Elective

LATN 1020 - Reading Latin II
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Review of first semester material. Vocabulary, morphology, syntax, and practice in reading. New material includes the regular verb, some irregular verbs, the fifth declension, the comparison of adjectives, the formation and comparison of adverbs, numerals, constructions of time and place, subordinate clauses, and uses of the subjunctive.
Prerequisite(s): (LATN 1010 or Latin Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1010)
Attributes: Catholic Studies-Elective, Foreign Language BS Req (A&S)

LATN 1200 - Latin Literature in Translation
Credit(s): 3 Credits

LATN 2010 - Intermediate Latin: Language & Literature
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Review of material learned during the first two semesters and coverage of remaining grammar; further vocabulary-extensions; extensive practice in reading continuous Latin prose.
Prerequisite(s): (LATN 1020 or Latin Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1020)
Attributes: Catholic Studies-Elective, Foreign Language BA Req (A&S)

Law

Faculty Liaison: Heather Bednarek, Ph.D. and Emmanuel Uwalaka, Ph.D.

POLS 1300 - Introduction to Law
Credit(s): 3 Credits
The purpose of the course is to provide students an introduction to the law and legal principles. The structure of the court system, civil litigation and methods of alternative dispute resolution will be examined. Elements of the following areas of substantive law: torts, contracts, property, trusts and estates, corporations, family law, and criminal law and procedure will be examined.
Attributes: Pol Sci Public Law Elective

MGT 2000 - Legal Environment of Business I
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Introduction to the U.S. legal system and to specific areas of the law such as torts, contracts, the law of agency and of business organizations. The course also covers American public law affecting businesses, including securities regulations, antitrust law, consumer protection, employment and environment law. Global and ethical issues are considered throughout.
Restrictions: Students in the School for Professional Studies college may not enroll.

Management

Faculty Liaison: Heather Bednarek, Ph.D.

MGT 2000 - Legal Environment of Business I
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Introduction to the U.S. legal system and to specific areas of the law such as torts, contracts, the law of agency and of business organizations. The course also covers American public law affecting businesses, including securities regulations, antitrust law, consumer protection, employment and environment law. Global and ethical issues are considered throughout.
Restrictions: Students in the Schl for Professional Studies college may not enroll.

Music

Faculty Liaison: Robert Hughes, Ph.D.

MUSC 1000 - Approaching the Arts: Music
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Introduction to the appreciation and understanding of the basic elements, genres, and style periods of Western music. Classical and popular styles will be presented; some live concert attendance will be required. Fulfills Fine Arts Core Requirement for non-majors.
Attributes: Fine Arts Requirement (A&S)

MUSC 1100 - Music Fundamentals
Credit(s): 3 Credits
An introductory course in music notation and the basic building blocks of western musical thought. Includes study of pitches, clefs , key signatures, scales, intervals, rhythms, symbols, terms, and basic harmony. Fulfills the Core Arts requirement for non-majors. If needed, it can serve as a preparatory study of music theory for music majors, but does not count toward the music degree.
Attributes: Fine Arts Requirement (A&S)

MUSC 1150 - History of Jazz
Credit(s)
: 3 Credits
An introduction to the development of Jazz and related American styles through lecture and extensive audio-video examples. Course work includes reading and listening assignments, two exams, one review of a live performance, and one brief paper. Fulfills Arts & Sciences Core Arts requirement for non-majors. May be used as a music literature elective for music majors.
Attributes: Fine Arts Requirement (A&S)

MUSC 1170 - World Music
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Introductory course to musical cultures around the world. History, sources, and aesthetic principles in each culture will be examined and compared with western society's Eurocentric styles. Students will learn to identify musical elements and characteristics unique to each culture, and acquire vocabulary for intelligent, respectful discussion of the topics.
Attributes: Fine Arts Requirement (A&S), Global Citizenship (A&S), International Studies, International Studies-Arts

MUSC 1400 - Lower Division Class Music
Credit(s): 1-2 Credits (Repeatability up to 9 credits)
Small group instruction in class voice or instrumental family. An Applied Music Fee is required.
Attributes: Fine Arts Requirement (A&S)

MUSC 2270 - Music Theory I
Credit(s): 3 Credits
The first of the four-semester sequence of intensive theoretical study required of all music majors. Students enrolled in this class should be literate musicians with considerable prior experience performing/reading music. Specific topics include review of basic principles of notation, major and minor scales, key signatures, intervals, triadic harmony, figured bass, melody and two-voice counterpoint, fundamentals of diatonic harmony, and part writing in two, three, and four voices. Course work includes lecture-discussion of chapters, assigned workbook pages, frequent chapter tests, sight singing practice, and weekly computer assignments in ear training. It is strongly recommended that non-pianists concurrently study class piano.
Attributes: Fine Arts Requirement (A&S)
Restrictions: 1818 Program sections must offer it as a semester course stretched over the length of a full year and (yearlong class)

Oceanography

Faculty Liaison: Dan Hanes, Ph.D.

EAS 1050 - Introduction to Oceanography
Credit(s): 1 or 3 Credits
Lecture three hours per week. Provides an introduction to ocean basin formation, chemical and physical properties of sea water, waves, currents, tidal forces and tides, interaction of land and ocean in coastal environments, marine biology and ocean resources. Fulfills three hours of science requirement. Spring semester, alternate years.
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)

Philosophy  

Faculty Liaison: James McCollum, Ph.D.

PHIL 1050 - Introduction to Philosophy: Self and Reality
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course will focus primarily on the writings of Plato and Aristotle as central figures in that historical period when Western humanity began to use and to develop reason systematically as an instrument for understanding the world and its place in that world. Students will be introduced to the Greek contributions to logic, metaphysics, and ethics.
Attributes: Philosophy Requirement (A&S)

Physics

Faculty Liaisons: Martin Nikolo, Ph.D.

PHYS 1220 - General Physics I
Credit(s): 4 Credits
Lectures, demonstrations, and laboratory in mechanics and heat. (Offered every Fall)
Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students in the Doisy College Health Sciences college.
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)

PHYS 1240 - General Physics II
Credit(s): 4 Credits
Lectures, demonstrations and laboratory in electricity, magnetism, wave motion, sound, optics and modern physics. (Offered every Spring)
Prerequisite(s): PHYS 1220
Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students in the Doisy College Health Sciences college.
Attributes: Natural Science Req (A&S)

Political Science

Faculty Liaison: Emmanuel Uwalaka, Ph.D.

POLS 1000 - Introduction to Politics
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Attributes: Social Science Req (A&S)

POLS 1100 - Introduction to American Government
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course is designed to provide students with an introduction to politics and government in the U.S. The course will focus primarily on political institutions (the rules and constraints placed upon political actors operating in the three branches of government) and mass behavior (how citizens behave and interpret the political world).
Attributes: Service Learning, Social Science Req (A&S)

POLS 1105 - Introduction to American Politics
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Prerequisite(s): ENGL 1505
Attributes: Prof. Studies Students Only

POLS 1150 - American Political Systems
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course will provide you with an overview of the literature and theoretical concepts associated with political science as it relates to American politics. The intent is to provide you with a sample of key findings in the literature, as well as help you develop critical skills for evaluating research.
Attributes: Social Science Req (A&S)

POLS 1300 - Introduction to Law
Credit(s): 3 Credits
The purpose of the course is to provide students an introduction to the law and legal principles.The structure of the court system, civil litigation and methods of alternative dispute resolution will be examined. Elements of the following areas of substantive law: torts, contracts, property, trusts and estates, corporations, family law, and criminal law and procedure will be examined.
Attributes: Pol Sci Public Law Elective

POLS 1500 - Introduction to Comparative Politics
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course introduces students to the logic, method, and theoretical approaches of comparative politics. It examines the institutions of government in various kinds of political systems around the world, particularly liberal democratic systems in advanced industrial countries, post-communist regimes, and new democracies in developing countries. It also investigates the process of political change, particularly modernization, democratization, globalization, state-building, and pressures on welfare state.
Attributes: Social Science Req (A&S)

POLS 1510 - Politics of Developing World
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course is an introduction to the domestic politics of developing countries in Africa, Asia, Eastern Europe, and Latin America. Topics include democracy and authoritarianism, economic development, political conflict, the role of political institutions, and political culture.
Attributes: Global Citizenship (A&S), Global Local Justice-Global, International Studies, International Studies-Economy, International Studies-General, Social Science Req (A&S)

POLS 1600 - Introduction to International Politics
Credit(s): 3-4 Credits
Role of power, ethics, law, public opinion, effectiveness, of various techniques of international relations; diplomacy, propaganda, subversion. Crucial problems. Proliferation of nuclear weapons, revolutionary warfare, hunger. How should we respond to the challenge?.
Attributes: Global Citizenship (A&S), International Studies, International Studies-General, Social Science Req (A&S)

POLS 1700 - Foundations of Political Theory
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course introduces students to political theory through competing answers to such questions as 'What is the difference between brute force and legitimate authority?' or 'What are rights and where do they come from?' Thinkers regularly studied include Plato, Aristotle, Hobbes, Locke and Rousseau.
Restrictions: Enrollment limited to students with a classification of Freshman or Sophomore.
Attributes: Social Science Req (A&S)

POLS 2010 - Ethics and Politics
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course challenges students to explore the relationship between moral values and political choices. Focusing on contemporary political issues, problems, and policies, we examine how different political philosophies, including Catholic social justice principles, provide different frameworks for judging the consequences of our political choices.
Attributes: Global Local Justice-Elective, Social Science Req (A&S), Urban Poverty - Social Justice, Diversity in the US (A&S)

POLS 2100 - The American Constitution
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course explores basic themes in the American Constitution—popular sovereignty, separation of powers, and federalism—and the historical struggles between various government actors over the allocation of political power in the American constitutional system from the Constitutional Convention in 1789 to the recent conflict over terrorism and state power.
Attributes: Social Science Req (A&S)

POLS 2520 - Introduction to African Politics
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Study of governments and political processes in Africa. Examines salient themes such as the nature of African traditional heritage; the colonial experience; nationalism and independence; the challenge of nation-building; African political parties; the role of the military and contributions of different theories to the understanding of African politics.
Attributes: Foreign Service Political Sci, Global Citizenship (A&S), Global Local Justice-Global, International Studies, International Studies-Africa, Social Science Req (A&S)

POLS 2820 - American Foreign Policy
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Assessment of extent of formal and informal influence within the decision-making process exerted by governmental and non-governmental agencies on current U.S. foreign policy. (Offered occasionally.)
Attributes: Foreign Service Political Sci, Social Science Req (A&S)

Pre-Calculus

Faculty Liaison: Mike May, S.J., Ph.D.

 

MATH 1400 - Pre-Calculus
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Functions, graphs and models; modeling with linear and quadratic functions; polynomial and rational functions; modeling with exponential and logarithmic functions; trigonometric functions; trigonometric identities and conditional equations; additional topics in trigonometry; additional topics in analytic geometry; parametric equations. (Offered every Fall, Spring and Summer)
Prerequisite(s): (Math Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1200 or MATH 1200 with a grade of C- or higher)
Attributes: Mathematics BA Req (A&S)

Public Speaking

Faculty Liaison: Elizabeth Richard, Ph.D.

CMM 1200 - Public Speaking
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Students are introduced to principles of effective public speaking and provided with opportunities to develop public speaking skills. In addition, standards of evaluation for public communication are established for use in evaluating their own and other's public speaking performances.

Psychology

Faculty Liaison: Janet Kuebli, Ph.D.

PSY 1010 - General Psychology
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Provides a basic and general knowledge of the theoretical, scientific, and conceptual foundations of psychology, including biological, cognitive, emotional, developmental, cultural and social aspects. Includes key concepts and principles, methods for collecting and evaluation evidence, and application of psychological knowledge. This course is a prerequisite for all upper division courses.
Attributes: Social Science Req (A&S)

Russian

Faculty Liaison: Elizabeth Blake, Ph.D.

RUSS 1010 - Communicating in Russian I
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Students will be introduced to a variety of print, audio, video, and digital resources in order to appreciate the use of Russian in real contexts. They will be able to relate basic personal information, to describe routine activities, to reply in basic phrases to everyday queries, and to respond in a general manner to requests for personal information. The importance of linguistic accuracy and the cultural significance of utterances will be repeatedly emphasized throughout the course as student gain a knowledge of the Russian alphabet, formal/informal greetings, verbal conjugations, and the adjectival and nominal declensions. Lab required.

RUSS 1020 - Communicating in Russian II
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Students will be introduced to a variety of print, audio, video, and digital resources in order to appreciate the use of Russian in real contexts. Students will be able to relate novice-level personal information about their living situations, families, studies, professions, shopping, and food preferences. The importance of linguistic accuracy and the cultural significance of utterances will be repeatedly emphasized throughout the course as student gain a novice-level knowledge of the verbal system (including all aspects and tenses), the verbs of motion, and all adjectival and nominal cases. 0 or 3 credit hours. Lab.
Prerequisite(s): (RUSS 1010 or Russian Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1010)
Attributes: Foreign Language BS Req (A&S)

RUSS 2010 - Intermediate Russian: Language and Culture
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Students will be introduced to a variety of print, audio, video, and digital resources to encourage them to reflect on cross-cultural comparisons and a culturally informed use of Russian. Students will be able to manage successfully in sentence-length discourse, at a minimum novice-high level, a range of topics relating to personal interests, including daily routine, hobbies, student life, and family history. They will be developing an ability to comprehend and compose paragraphs related to personal interests at the intermediate level, as they more fully master complex sentence formation and usage as well as temporal expressions. Lab required.
Prerequisite(s): (RUSS 1020 or Russian Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1020)
Attributes: Foreign Language BA Req (A&S)

RUSS 2020 - Intermediate Russian: Language and Culture II
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Students will be introduced to a variety of print, audio, video, and digital resources to encourage them to reflect on cross-cultural comparisons and a culturally informed use of Russian. Students will be able to manage successfully in sentence-length discourse at an intermediate level a range of personal, cultural, and travel-related topics. The development of critical reading skills with a study of participles, comparative structures, and content analysis is a focus of the course. 0 or 3 credit hours. Lab required.
Prerequisite(s): RUSS 2010
Attributes: Foreign Language BA Req (A&S), Foreign Language BS Req (A&S)

Spanish

Faculty Liaison: Germán Lorenzo-Ayala, M.A.

SPAN 1010 - Communicating in Spanish I
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Introduction to Spanish language and culture. Prepares student to operate within areas of immediate needs and simple situations.

SPAN 1020 - Communicating in Spanish II
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Continuation of SPAN-1010. Prepares the student to function in simple situations related to personal interests and daily life.
Prerequisite(s): (LP Spanish Placement with a minimum score of 2, SPAN 1010, or Spanish Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1010)
Attributes: Foreign Language BS Req (A&S)

SPAN 2010 - Inter Spanish: Lang & Culture
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Continued practice in all skills. Readings in and discussion of Hispanic Culture.
Prerequisite(s): (SPAN 1020, Spanish Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1020, LP Spanish Placement with a minimum score of 3, or SPAN 1200)
Attributes: Foreign Language BA Req (A&S)

SPAN 2050 - Speaking in Spanish
Credit(s): 1-3 Credits
Prerequisite(s): (SPAN 1020 or Spanish Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1020)
Attributes: Foreign Language BA Req (A&S), Foreign Language BS Req (A&S)

Statistics

Faculty Liaison: Kimberly Druschel, Ph.D.

MATH 1300 - Elementary Statistics with Computers
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Data production and analysis; probability basics, distributions; sampling, estimation with confidence intervals, hypothesis testing, t-test; correlation and regression; crosstabulations and chi-square. Students learn to use a statistical package such as SPSS. Credit not given for MATH 1300 and any of the following: STAT 1300 or OPM 2070.
Prerequisite(s): (MATH 1200 or Math Waiver per Advisor with a minimum score of 1200)
Attributes: Chemical Biology Elective, Mathematics BA Req (A&S)

Sociology

Faculty Liaison: Arline Cravens, Ph.D.

SOC 1100 - Introduction to Sociology
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This introductory course emphasizes fundamental concepts in sociology and their application to contemporary society for the purpose of enhancing the students understanding of the world in which they live.
Attributes: Service Learning, Social Science Req (A&S)

SOC 1180 - World Geography
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course provides students with a worldwide overview of the relationship between people and place. Emphasis is given to the relationships among physical geography, environment, population, economy and culture.
Attributes: Foreign Service Elective, Global Citizenship (A&S), International Studies, International Studies-Economy, International Studies-Health, Social Science Req (A&S)

SOC 1190 - Cultural Geography
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course will familiarize the student with broad themes in cultural geography. Student will begin to think critically about how humans interact with their environments, analyze daily geographies and complete practice based assignments that explore core concepts of cultural geography.
Attributes: Social Science Req (A&S)

SOC 2000 - Research Methods
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Students are introduced to key issues involved in sociological research, the design of research to answer distinct types of questions, the nature and techniques of measurement and the major modes of data collection and analysis.
Prerequisite(s): (SOC 1100, SOC 1110, SOC 1120, or ANTH 1200)
Attributes: Social Science Req (A&S)

Theatre

Faculty Liaison: David LaRose, M.F.A.

THR 1000 - Approaching the Arts: Theatre
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Objectives: 1. To examine some public impressions of the role of the arts in American society; 2. To demonstrate to students, through lecture and discussion, some of the key features of a play in performance which critics, fans, and theatre artists have sought in contemporary productions; 3. To introduce some of the students to the standard tasks and procedures brought to hear in play productions; 4.To apply all of these studies to the appreciation of plays by viewing several live productions during the semester. Satisfies the Arts and Science Core Requirement for non-majors.
Attributes: Fine Arts Requirement (A&S)

THR 1010 - Introduction to Performing Arts
Credit(s): 3 Credits
The goal of this course is to introduce students to the world of the performing arts in Western culture. After a set of synthetic historical and theoretical lectures, the course will focus on single works inspired by the same subject, chosen within the main repertoire of each discipline (drama, opera, ballet, concert music, musical theatre).This will allow the students to appreciate how the same ideas can be treated differently according to the artistic medium to which they are adapted.

THR 1500 - Introduction to Theatre
Credit(s): 3 Credits
An introduction to the process of making theatre. Students will work on producing theatre and discuss aesthetic and practical considerations in theatre production. Satisfies the Arts and Science Core Requirement for non-majors.
Attributes: Fine Arts Requirement (A&S)

Theology

Faculty Liaison: Jay Hammond, Ph.D.

THEO 1000 - Theological Foundations
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Prerequisite to all further courses. This course begins the disciplined reflection on religion in the university. Along with providing the basic vocabulary, method of theology, and key theological concepts, it equips the student with the historical, textual, and comparative methods and skills that are foundational for further study on the university level. Offered every semester.
Attributes: Theology BA Requirement (A&S), Theology BS Requirement (A&S)

THEO 2110 - Old Testament
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Literary and historical study of the Hebrew Bible, its cultural background, main them, the problems modern thought poses for it, and its permanent significance.
Prerequisite(s): THEO 1000
Attributes: Catholic Studies-Theology, Middle East Studies, Theology BS Requirement (A&S), Theology Old Testament

THEO 2210 - New Testament
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Books of the New Testament; their formation as literary material, message and meaning for the modern world, and transmission via the community.
Prerequisite(s): THEO 1000
Attributes: Catholic Studies-Theology, Middle East Studies, Theology BA Requirement (A&S), Theology BS Requirement (A&S), Theology New Testament

THEO 2333 - Race and Religion in America: The Search for Identity
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course considers counter-cultural Black religious movements of resistance during the Great Migration, whose origins are directly linked to their attempt to jettison racial categories that were constructed as cultural productions aimed at undermining the dignity of Black people. To this end we will survey Black religions such as the Nation of Islam, Black Spiritual Movements, Hebrew-Israelite organizations, and the Black Coptic Church, toward the goal of understanding how they respond religiously and theologically to the problem of race, imaginatively and pragmatically. Prerequisite: THEO 1000.
Attributes: Theology BA Requirement (A&S), Theology BS Requirement (A&S)
 
THEO 2410 - Making Christianity Credible
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course aims at providing a comprehensive understanding of Christian faith by investigating the historical development and interrelation of its main tenets. Attention will be given to how Christian beliefs arise from, and themselves give distinct shape to, Christian practices in the Church and the world.
Prerequisite(s): THEO 1000
Attributes: Catholic Studies

THEO 2425 - God in Human Experience
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Explores how humans have understood the notion of God with emphasis on the Christian traditions, the God of Jesus of Nazareth.

THEO 2510 - Christian Ethics
Credit(s): 3 Credits
An exploration of Christian character (virtues), principles of decision making, conscience formation, authoritative sources (scripture, tradition, magisterium, etc.) with analysis of issues such as war, capital punishment, physician-assisted suicide, abortion, etc.
Prerequisite(s): THEO 1000
Attributes: Catholic Studies-Theology, Theology BA Requirement (A&S), Theology BS Requirement (A&S)

THEO 2515 - Social Justice
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course is designed to engage students in the reality of social injustice while introducing them to the variety of ways in which the Christian tradition responds to this reality. Students will study selections from scripture, Catholic Social Teaching, Christian theologians, and the lives of Christian saints and martyrs. This course fulfills the Cultural Diversity in the U.S. Core requirement by addressing issues of racism, classism, and sexism, and by engaging the works of African American, feminist, womanist, and Latino/a theologians. Students should leave the course with a better understanding of Christian perspectives on social justice that can be applied to their own faith or spirituality, political choices, and way of life.
Attributes: Catholic Studies-Theology, International Studies, Theology BA Requirement (A&S), Theology BS Requirement (A&S), Urban Poverty - General, Urban Poverty - Social Justice, Women's & Gender Studies

THEO 2520 - Comparative Religious Ethics
Credit(s): 3 Credits
An exploration of several moral issues and the ethical beliefs/practices that are brought to bear on them among various religious traditions around the world. Attention will be devoted to narratives of significant persons who contributed to human dignity, rights, and liberation, especially with regard to 'the other.' Prerequisite(s): THEO-1000.
Prerequisite(s): THEO 1000
Attributes: Foreign Service Elective

THEO 2530: Contemplation in Action (Social Injustice/Social Gospel)
Credit(s): 3 Credits 
The primary goal of this course is to animate by contemplative-action SLU’s mission to form leaders who desire to transform society in the spirit of the Gospels. It will pursue this goal as a reciprocal learning class about contemplation in action that is guided by Jesuit spiritual and intellectual ideals. The theological framework for the class will be personal encounter: between self and other/neighbor (action), between self and God (contemplation), and between self in formation/transformation (integration). The scriptural genesis derives from the two great commandments to love God and neighbor as oneself (Mk 12:28-34; Lk 10:25-28; Mt 22:34-40; also see Jn 13:34-35, 15:12; 1 Jn 4:20).
Prerequisite(s): THEO 1000

THEO 2610 - The Christian Sacraments
Credit(s): 3 Credits
The Sacraments, the Church as ultimate manifestation of Covenant of the People of God, development of sacraments in apostolic community and patristic age, modern sacramental theology.
Prerequisite(s): THEO 1000
Attributes: Catholic Studies-Theology, Theology BA Requirement (A&S), Theology BS Requirement (A&S) 

THEO 2710 - Religions of the World
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course is an introduction to the history, belief-systems, practices, and divisions of the world’s major religions. It focuses especially on Hinduism, Sikhism, Buddhism, Jainism, Confucianism, Taoism, Shintoism, Zoroastrianism, Judaism, Christianity, Islam, the Baha'i Faith, and Native American spirituality. The only prerequisite is Theology 100: Theological Foundations.
Prerequisite(s): THEO 1000
Attributes: Foreign Service Elective, Global Citizenship (A&S), International Studies, International Studies-Arts, Theology BA Requirement (A&S), Theology BS Requirement (A&S)

THEO 2820 - Religion and Science
Credit(s): 3 Credits
This course examines the history and recent development of three disciplines--cosmology, physics, and biology--to show how religion and science have related to one another in the past and relate to one another in contemporary research and reflection. A final part of the course considers some issues that involve multiple scientific disciplines (e.g., extraterrestrial intelligence, environmentalism, etc.). Credit not given for both THEO 2820 and BIOL 2560.
Attributes: Catholic Studies-Theology, Theology BA Requirement (A&S), Theology BS Requirement (A&S)

THEO 2905 - Death and Suffering
Credit(s): 3 Credits
Judeo-Christian response to the mystery of suffering, the meaning of death, healing as a religious experience. Reference to the bible, contemporary Christian theology, and social studies.
Prerequisite(s): THEO 1000
Attributes: Theology BA Requirement (A&S), Theology BS Requirement (A&S)

Women's and Gender Studies

Faculty Liaison: Amanda Izzo, Ph.D.

WGST 1900 - Introduction to Women's Studies (3)
Examines issues concerning women in a variety of disciplines, including the humanities, the social sciences, the sciences, and art. Special focus given to enabling students to recognize and critically analyze the notion of gender and patterns of gender roles. 

Course Evaluations

Student course evaluations are central to the continual improvement of curriculum and the quality of instruction throughout Saint Louis University. Just as students in an on-campus course are given the opportunity to evaluate their courses, the 1818 Advanced College Credit Program also desires feedback from students in dual-credit courses.

Individual evaluations are confidential and anonymous. The information gained from these evaluations are only available to the course instructor and 1818 Program administration. The responses are used internally by the 1818 Program to improve individual course offerings at the high schools.

Instructors will receive an email at the end of the evaluation period with a link to their evaluations. These evaluations can also be accessed through Banner.

New Course Approval Process

Members of the 1818 community can propose current on-campus 1000- and 2000-level SLU courses to be considered as potential dual-credit offerings to high school partners.

In order for a course to be considered, the individual needs to submit a proposal to the 1818 Advanced College Credit program director that includes:

  • The official published university course description and course number for the proposed course.
  • A copy of the proposed syllabus in the SLU 1818 course syllabus template.

Once the proposal has been submitted to the 1818 Advanced College Credit office, the program will petition the respective SLU department  for consideration and submit the documentation for review and approval. The 1818 program office will contact the individual once a decision about the course offering has been made by the SLU department.